Adjunctive analgesic therapy
by
Lamont LA, Tranquilli WJ, Mathews KA
Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine,
College of Veterinary Medicine,
University of Illinois,
Urbana, USA.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2000 Jul; 30(4):805-13, vii


ABSTRACT

Adjuvant analgesics are drugs that have weak or nonexistent analgesic action when administered alone but can enhance analgesic actions when coadministered with known analgesic agents. Such agents are often administered in cases of refractory pain. For some chronic pain syndromes, however, they may constitute a first-line approach. Because pain is such an individual experience, analgesic regimens may require several drugs at varying dosages to confer a comfortable state. Adjunctive therapies such as the tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonists and low-dose intravenous local anesthetics, to name a few, have proved to be efficacious in relieving certain types of pain, especially neuropathic and cancer pain. Their use in animals is increasing, with anecdotal reports of some success.
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